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  • $24,749

    Should Art Be Moral? The Ancient Quarrel Between Philosophy and Poetry


    Recipient: Alznauer, Mark Vinzenz (Evanston, IL 60208-2214 USA) in affiliation with Northwestern University (Evanston, IL 60208 USA)

    Goal: The development of a one-semester course that would be offered at least twice, for twenty undergraduates, on the question of the moral value of art.

    Description: In this seminar-style course, we will look at some of the most prominent episodes of what Plato called "the ancient quarrel between philosophy and poetry" in order to compass the alternative answers given to the perennial question: should art be moral? In pursuing this question, we will examine both the works of art that have figured most prominently in this debate as well as the philosophic and literary disputes that have followed in their wake. The course is comprised of three units. The first concerns the pre-modern background of the quarrel and will include readings from Sophocles, Plato, and Dante, among others. The second unit deals with the reemergence of this debate in modern writers such as Moliere, Rousseau, Schiller and Nietzsche. In the last unit, we turn to five late modern poets and writers who have explicitly treated the relation of morality to their art: Tolstoy, Brecht, Eliot, Woolf and O'Connor.

    Grant: 196724 / AQ-50099-10,   Category: Interdisciplinary,   Program: ,   Year Awarded: 2010

  • $344,978

    "American Visions" a Picturing America School Collaboration Project


    Recipient: Lind, Ted (Newark, NJ 07102 USA) in affiliation with Newark Museum (Newark, NJ 07101 USA)

    Goal: Three two-and-one-half day conferences in winter, spring, and summer 2010, for a total of 225 educators, to strengthen the use of Picturing America images in teaching core subjects in schools.

    Description: The Newark Museum proposes to present American Visions, a School Collaboration Project that will provide 225 American K-12 educators and librarians with the knowledge, skills, and resources that they will need to design, implement, and evaluate curriculum lessons/units that connect with the goals of Picturing America. Building on the success of a modest Picturing America teacher institute presented at the Museum in August 2008 (supported by a NEH Chairmans Grant), this proposal will give the participants opportunities to collaborate with educators from across the nation, museum educators and curators, prominent scholars in the humanities, educational specialists in curriculum design/evaluation, and computer specialists. "American Visions" will be comprised of pre-conference activities, three 2 and 1/2 day conferences held throughout 2009/2010, and post-conference evaluation and dissemination sessions utilizing technological resources.

    Grant: 196100 / AP-50011-09,   Category: Education,   Program: Picturing America School Collaboration Projects,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $317,849

    "Interpreting the American Landscape" -- Picturing America School Collaboration Project Conferences


    Recipient: Greene, Daniel (Chicago, IL 60610 USA) in affiliation with Newberry Library

    Goal: Two-day conferences in October 2009 and April 2010, for fifty-four educators each, to strengthen the use of Picturing America images in the teaching of core subjects, primarily in high schools. (Ashbrook)

    Description: The Newberry Library proposes to host two Picturing America School Collaboration Project Conferences, which will provide one hundred and eight teachers with access to each other; to experts in art history, history, literature, and geography; and to Chicago's rich local resources in American art. Our conferences will take "Interpreting the American Landscape" as a capacious and inclusive organizing theme. Our conference sessions will explore the role of landscape imagery in shaping national identity, tracing the shift from a nineteenth-century emphasis on visions of pristine wilderness and rural landscapes to the twentieth-century's urban and industrial scenery. The conferences will be held at the Newberry Library on October 23-24, 2009, and April 16-17, 2010. The nationwide target audience will be secondary-level history, language arts, and art teachers whose schools already have received the Picturing America portfolio.

    Grant: 196092 / AP-50003-09,   Category: American History,   Program: Picturing America School Collaboration Projects,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $227,196

    Native Cultures of Western Alaska and the Pacific Northwest Coast


    Recipient: Scheper, George L (Baltimore, MD 21217 USA) in affiliation with Community College Humanities Association (Newark, NJ 07102 USA)

    Goal: A four-week college and university teacher institute for twenty-four participants on the native cultures of the Pacific Northwest, to be held in Alaska and British Columbia.

    Description: CCHA requests funding for a NEH Summer Institute for 24 faculty from community and four-year colleges and universities on the topic, "Native Cultures of Western Alaska and the Pacific Northwest Coast," on-site in Alaska and British Columbia June 13- July 12, 2010. The indigenous peoples of this region developed complex societies with rich histories that were recorded in oral traditions, and they are noted for producing a great world artistic tradition. These cultures were intensively studied in the 19th and 20th centuries, yet in many ways only now are beginning to be understood. Our Institute will present the latest perspectives on the most recent scholarship on Northwest Coast history and culture, as presented by eleven visiting scholars and local artists. Northwest Coast peoples have been in the vanguard of a cultural renaissance. The study of the Northwest Coast cultures, from prehistoric to contemporary times, is an opportunity to expand the reach of America Studies.

    Grant: 197411 / EH-50189-09,   Category: Interdisciplinary,   Program: Institutes for College and University Teachers,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $226,602

    Shanghai and Berlin: Cultures of Urban Modernism in Interwar China and Germany


    Recipient: Berman, Russell (Stanford, CA 94305-2031 USA) in affiliation with Stanford University (Stanford, CA 94305 USA)

    Goal: A six-week college and university teacher seminar for sixteen participants to explore urban modernism in Shanghai and Berlin in the period between the first and second world wars.

    Description: The purpose of this seminar is to explore urban modernism in Shanghai and Berlin, primarily in the period between the first and second world wars and through select literary and cinematic works. Urban modernism involves the transformation of everyday culture in the wake of the rapid erosion of traditional hierarchies and values. It found expression in revised life-styles, gender roles, and structures of individuality. The seminar approaches these aspects of modernism, as part of a wider concept of modernity, through a comparative approach of Chinese and German material. It examines how the expression and representation of the modern metropolis developed in the two contexts. It also inquires into elements of instability in modernism and the challenge it faced from revolutionary movements on the right and left.

    Grant: 197346 / FS-50212-09,   Category: Comparative Literature,   Program: Seminars for College Teachers,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $220,960

    'Democratic Vistas': Civic Life, History and American Art


    Recipient: Zeiger, Susan (Watertown, MA 02472 USA) in affiliation with Primary Source

    Goal: Two conferences of two days each in summer 2009 for up to 100 educators, to strengthen the use of Picturing America images in the teaching of core subjects in the school curriculum.

    Description: Up to 100 educators from diverse geographic regions will take part in two, two-day conferences in Boston on the democratic tradition in American art and engage in follow-up activities to apply the knowledge they gain with the support of project staff and scholars. The major goals of the project are: (1)To deepen the knowledge, capacity and confidence of educators to teach about important works of art as an expression of the inclusive democratic tradition in America; (2)To cultivate an understanding of how to incorporate a diverse array of artworks across core K-12 subjects; (3)To model to participating educators the ways in which local art resources inform and enrich classroom studies; and (4) To generate a lasting, on-line resource, free for use by the public, to disseminate the highlights of the conferences, as well as the curriculum projects they generate, to all interested educators.

    Grant: 196101 / AP-50012-09,   Category: American Studies,   Program: Picturing America School Collaboration Projects,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $218,315

    Folger Shakespeare Library's Teaching Shakespeare 2010 Institute


    Recipient: Young, Robert G (Washington, DC 20003 USA) in affiliation with Folger Shakespeare Library

    Goal: A four-week school teacher institute for twenty-five participants to examine Shakespeare's plays.

    Description: Folger Shakespeare Library proposes Teaching Shakespeare 2010, a four-week summer institute for secondary school teachers. A group of 25 participants, working with a faculty of resident and visiting scholars, resident actors, and curriculum consultants, will undertake an intensive examination of I Henry IV, Twelfth Night, Measure for Measure, and Macbeth from the mutually illuminating perspectives of reading the texts closely, examining primary sources to reconstruct historical and cultural contexts, exploring the filmed versions and performance histories of the plays, and exploring performance possibilities. Participants will collaborate on new teaching strategies incorporating technology to be disseminated in classrooms and through the Folger website.

    Grant: 197463 / ES-50295-09,   Category: British Literature,   Program: Institutes for School Teachers,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $215,287

    Cotton Culture in the South from the Civil War to the Civil Rights Movement


    Recipient: Gardner, Sarah E (Macon, GA 31207-0001 USA) in affiliation with Mercer University, Macon (Macon, GA 31207 USA)

    Goal: A five-week high school teacher institute for twenty-one participants on the South's cotton culture from the close of the Civil War to the rise of the Civil Rights movement.

    Description: The southern studies faculty at Mercer University proposes to host a five-week NEH institute for high school teachers on Cotton Culture in the South from the Civil War to the Civil Rights Movement. The institute will allow twenty-one teachers of English, history, economics, government, geography, art, and music to learn about the complex social structures of the U.S. South in the crucial yet frequently misunderstood hundred years after the war, a period that included both major social problems and amazing cultural development. An interdisciplinary panel of experts on the South will use the cultivation of cotton--the South's most significant economic product during this time--as a means to analyze and understand the region's history, geography, economics, politics, culture, and literature.

    Grant: 197461 / ES-50293-09,   Category: Regional Studies,   Program: Institutes for School Teachers,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $210,566

    House of Mortals and Gods: Latin Literature in Context


    Recipient: Dougherty, Therese Marie (Baltimore, MD 21210-2404 USA) in affiliation with College of Notre Dame of Maryland (Baltimore, MD 21210 USA)

    Goal: A five-week school teacher institute for twenty-five participants to study Latin texts on the themes of house and household in and around Rome and in the region of Pompeii.

    Description: College of Notre Dame of Maryland will hold a five-week Summer Institute (June 27-July 28, 2010)for middle and high school Latin teachers. The program will begin at Notre Dame in Baltimore, Maryland and mot to Italy after the first week for the remainder of the institute. Lectures and readings of literary and non-literary Latin texts will be complemented by visits to related sites. The theme of house and household will help to focus the experience on the reality of life in ancient Rome and the practical issues regarding property and personal relationships that resembled concerns of society today. Teachers may read the texts in Latin or in translation. They will design instructional materials for future classroom use.

    Grant: 197478 / ES-50310-09,   Category: Classics,   Program: Institutes for School Teachers,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $208,576

    The New Negro Renaissance in America, 1919-1941


    Recipient: Early, Gerald (St. Louis, MO 63130 USA) in affiliation with Washington University

    Goal: A three-week school teacher institute for thirty participants on the social, cultural and political dynamics encompassing African-American communities in the interwar period.

    Description: "The New Negro Renaissance in America" aims to introduce junior and senior high school teachers of various disciplines to interdisciplinary approaches to an important era in African American social, cultural, and political history: The New Negro Renaissance of the 1920s and 1920s, sometimes referred to as the Harlem Renaissance. The primary goal of the institute is to work with teachers to show how, through the study of the social, cultural, political, and literary history of a major epoch in African American life, they can reconfigure aspects of teaching their particular disciplines while broadening students' understanding of the rich complexity of both the United States as a whole and of the specific disciplines they are taught.

    Grant: 197458 / ES-50290-09,   Category: American Studies,   Program: Institutes for School Teachers,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $208,394

    Mapping and Art in the Americas: An NEH Summer Institute for College Faculty


    Recipient: Akerman, James R (Chicago, IL 60610 USA) in affiliation with Newberry Library

    Goal: A five-week college and university teacher institute for twenty-five participants to explore the relationship between art and mapping in the Americas.

    Description: The Newberry Library's Hermon Dunlap Smith Center for the History of Cartography seeks NEH support for a 5-week summer institute for college faculty that will scrutinize the interplay between American art and mapping from the Transatlantic Encounter into the 21st century. The institute, led by James Akerman (Dir. of Smith Center) and Diane Dillon (Asst. Dir. of Research & Education) will feature a guest faculty of 14 specialists in art, cartography, geography, philosophy, American history, map librarianship, and literary studies. The institute's program of lectures, seminars, workshops, and research will encourage 25 participants to cross disciplinary boundaries and move beyond regional and chronological specialties to address the complex history of the relationship between art and mapping in and of the Americas. Participants will also pursue their own projects and explore unfamiliar primary materials, including the Newberry's rich holdings in the humanities.

    Grant: 197422 / EH-50200-09,   Category: American History,   Program: Institutes for College and University Teachers,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $200,000

    The Wright Connection: Native Son, Black Boy, and Uncle Tom's Children


    Recipient: Graham, Maryemma (Lawrence, KS 66045-7590 USA) in affiliation with University of Kansas Center for Research, Inc (Lawrence, KS 66045-3101 USA)

    Goal: : A two-week high school teacher institute for thirty participants to explore Richard Wright's Native Son, Black Boy, and Uncle Tom's Children within their historical contexts.

    Description: The institute will read Wright's texts conspicuously absent from many curricula despite the direct connection to contemporary concerns about literacy, tolerance, and diversity central to national dialogue. Native Son, Black Boy, and Uncle Tom's Children, two short stories and select poems will link close reading, guided research, and seminars and workshops by scholars, practitioners, and specialists approached from a range of perspectives. New technologies, including a website and virtual seminars, will expand learning opportunities post-institute and offer access to a larger community of educators. Teachers will contribute to the construction of a digital sourcebook, to maximize the use of technology for sharing their course materials. The import lies in the role of education in a civil society, reaffirming a key goal of humanities education: to elicit a keen sense of identity from an examination of past deeds, events, documents, and forms of self-expression from our cultural past.

    Grant: 199826 / ES-50320-09,   Category: American Literature,   Program: Institutes for School Teachers,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $199,989

    Cultural Hybridities: Christians, Muslims and Jews and the Medieval Mediterranean


    Recipient: Catlos, Brian A (Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA) in affiliation with University of California, Santa Cruz

    Goal: A four-week college and university faculty institute in Barcelona for twenty-five participants to examine the role that Mediterranean-based interactions of Christians, Jews, and Muslims played in the emergence of the pre-modern West.

    Description: The University of California, Santa Cruz proposes a 4-week inter-disciplinary Summer Institute for 24 college and university faculty to examine the medieval Mediterranean (c. 1100--1500) and its role in the emergence of the modern West. This is a sequel to our 2008 NEH Institute. Building on the infrastructure and collaborative relationships we established, we have revised our program in view of feedback from our 2008 participants. The Institute will focus on the Mediterranean as a zone where Christians, Muslims, and Jews came into contact, in peace as well as in war. This interaction made the Mediterranean region a forum for intellectual and cultural innovation and exchange, the dissemination of which was key in the emergence of the modern West. Our goal is once again to bring together a diverse group of scholars whose research and teaching would, as in 2008, benefit from and contribute to a reformulated understanding of the Mediterrean's role in the development of modernity.

    Grant: 197425 / EH-50203-09,   Category: History,   Program: Institutes for College and University Teachers,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $199,876

    Mozart's Worlds: The German Operas


    Recipient: Benedum, Richard P (Dayton, OH 45469-0104 USA) in affiliation with University of Dayton (Dayton, OH 45469 USA)

    Goal: A four-week school teacher institute in Vienna, Austria, for twenty-five participants to explore Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and his German operas in their cultural and historical context.

    Description: The University of Dayton seeks support for a four-week interdisciplinary institute, "Mozart's Worlds: The German Operas," for twenty five teachers chosen from across the country. We will study intensively Die Entfuhrung aus dem Serail (The Abduction from the Seraglio) and Die Zauberflote (The Magic Flute), bookends to the final decade of his life, after he had moved to Vienna. This Institute reflects the belief that scholarship, cultural and historical context, and curriculum development should be closely linked. Thus, the Institute will immerse its 25 participants in these multiple "worlds" of Mozart: eighteenth century Hapsburg history and Enlightenment philosophy, the built environment of Vienna with its imperial architecture, the dramatic and literary conventions that Mozart inherited, understood, and used so successfully, and of course, his music.

    Grant: 197460 / ES-50292-09,   Category: Music History and Criticism,   Program: Institutes for School Teachers,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $199,823

    Picturing Early America: People, Places, and Events 1770-1870


    Recipient: Johnston, Patricia A (Salem, MA 01970 USA) in affiliation with Salem State College (Salem, MA 01970-5353 USA)

    Goal: A four-week school teacher institute for twenty-five participants focusing on interpreting and teaching early American art as an aspect of the nation's history and culture.

    Description: Salem State College proposes to hold a four-week Summer Institute, from July 4 to July 30, 2010, for 25 school teachers on interpreting and teaching early American art. This interdisciplinary institute will appeal to teachers of history, English, art, and other subjects. The institute explores the period from British colonial settlement to the aftermath of the Civil War, and will be divided into three units based on the primary pictorial forms of the period: portraiture, history painting, and landscapes. Each unit will include a particular focus on what we are calling "spotlight" works-art included in NEH's Picturing America series. Teachers will come to understand American art works in their historical contexts and develop creative ways to teach their disciplines while using the Picturing America images.

    Grant: 197477 / ES-50309-09,   Category: Arts History & Criticism,   Program: Institutes for School Teachers,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $199,756

    Representations of the "Other": Jews in Medieval Christendom


    Recipient: Resnick, Irven M (Chattanooga, TN 37403 USA) in affiliation with University of Tennessee, Chattanooga (Chattanooga, TN 37402 USA)

    Goal: A five-week institute to be held at the Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies (UK) for twenty-five college and university teachers to examine the evolution of medieval European conceptions of alterity.

    Description: This proposal seeks funding to hold a five-week summer institute to be held July 2, 2010 - August 11, 2010. The summer institute will allow participants to gain a better understanding of changes in the legal status, economic conditions, cultural stereotypes and depictions of Jews as the most visible and problematic minority group in medieval Christendom.

    Grant: 197410 / EH-50188-09,   Category: Medieval Studies,   Program: Institutes for College and University Teachers,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $199,607

    The Silk Roads: Early Globalization and Chinese Cultural Identity


    Recipient: Hershock, Peter D (Honolulu, HI 96848 USA) in affiliation with East-West Center

    Goal: A five-week college and university faculty institute for twenty-five participants to explore the rich history of the Silk Road.

    Description: Funding is sought for a 5-week summer institute on "The Silk Roads: Early Globalization and Chinese Cultural Identities." This program will be hosted by the Asian Studies Development Program, a Federal/State collaborative project of the East-West Center and the University of Hawaii. Through the proposed institute, 25 non-specialist, undergraduate educators will be introduced to the rich history and imaginaire of the Silk Roads to examine how global interconnectedness shapes and is shaped by culture, focusing on the complex relationships through which Chinese cultures came to be among the world's most resilient and diverse.

    Grant: 197417 / EH-50195-09,   Category: Asian Studies,   Program: Institutes for College and University Teachers,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $193,100

    Abolitionism and the Underground Railroad in Upstate New York


    Recipient: Hodges, Graham Russell (Hamilton, NY 13346 USA) in affiliation with Colgate University

    Goal: A four-week school teacher institute for twenty-five participants on upstate New York's national role and leadership in conducting fugitive slaves on the Underground Railroad line to Canada.

    Description: A Four-Week Summer Institute for teachers on Abolitionism and the Underground Railroad in Upstate New York to be held at Colgate University, Hamilton, New York from June 27-July 23, 2010. The proposed institute will provide to twenty-five middle and high school teachers lectures, discussions by some of the nation's foremost scholars in the field, supply ample secondary readings and primary texts, and offer film and three field trips to sites relevant to the institute's purpose. Graham Russell Hodges, the George Dorland Langdon, Jr. Professor of History and Africana Studies at Colgate will organize and direct the institute.

    Grant: 197453 / ES-50285-09,   Category: American History,   Program: Institutes for School Teachers,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $189,917

    Not Just a Scenic Road: The Blue Ridge Parkway and Its History


    Recipient: Specht, Neva Jean (Boone, NC 28608 USA) in affiliation with Appalachian State University

    Goal: Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on the history and culture of the Blue Ridge Parkway.

    Description: Appalachian State University seeks funds to offer two, one-week teacher workshops for eighty K-12 teachers during the summer 2010 focusing on the National Park Services' historic Blue Ridge Parkway located just five miles from the University. The Parkway's history reflects some of the most salient themes in United State history. The resources of the University, which include distinguished faculty with expertise in the Parkway and the Appalachian Mountains, as well as the Appalachian Collection, and ready access to the Park itself, make it an ideal venue for the study of this historic landmark.

    Grant: 197497 / BH-50313-09,   Category: American History,   Program: Landmarks of American History,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $185,561

    Mesoamerican Cultures and their Histories: Focus on Oaxaca


    Recipient: Wood, Stephanie G (Eugene, OR 97403-1201 USA) in affiliation with University of Oregon, Eugene (Eugene, OR 97403 USA)

    Goal: A four-week school teacher summer institute for twenty-five to thirty participants highlighting recent archaeological and ethnohistorical research on the indigenous peoples of Oaxaca, Mexico.

    Description: This four-week summer institute for K-12 school teachers of history, art, and Spanish language will be held in Oaxaca, Mexico and is designed to facilitate the expanded integration of Mesoamerican cultural heritage materials, including new discoveries and the latest research, into curricular units that will appeal to a variety of learners and bring greater multicultural depth and understanding into U.S. classrooms. The aim is to explore how the histories of Mesoamerican peoples might provide useful comparisons for exploring humanities questions in the broader American and the global context. We will address questions such as how peoples move from non-sedentary to more settled societies; what leads to city formation; the emergence of writing and literacy; the development of complex societies, cultural florescence (and decline); how empires are built and what the human consequences are; and, what are the outcomes of cultural encounters and exchange.

    Grant: 199823 / ES-50317-09,   Category: Latin American History,   Program: Institutes for School Teachers,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • Endowment for the humanities grants to division Education Programs; items 1-21 of 6923 with a total funding of $4,191,101.
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