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  • $350,000

    Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe


    Recipient: Dackerman, Susan (Cambridge, MA 02138 USA) in affiliation with Harvard University

    Goal: Implementation of a traveling exhibition, a colloquium, a catalog, an interactive website, and educational and public programs exploring the alliance between printmakers and scientists in the 16th century.

    Description: The Harvard Art Museum will organize, present, and circulate a groundbreaking interpretive exhibition that will transform traditional assumptions about the role of artists in the production of new forms of knowledge during the Renaissance???s Scientific Revolution. The museum requests funds for the implementation of the major traveling exhibition, Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe, and for support of its related publications and public programming. The exhibition, which opens jointly at Harvard???s Sackler Museum and Wellesley College???s Davis Art Museum, addresses the participation of such celebrated northern European artists as Albrecht D??rer, Hendrick Goltzius, and Hans Holbein in the scientific inquiries of the sixteenth century, especially as manifested in their printed works. Such an investigation reveals the previously unexamined close working relationships between the artistic and scientific communities, and the exchanges of influence between them.

    Grant: 194753 / GI-50097-10,   Category: Arts History & Criticism,   Division: Public Programs,   Year Awarded: 2010

  • $1,000,000

    The Buddha and Pilgrimage and Buddhist Art


    Recipient: Proser, Adriana (New York, NY 10021 USA) in affiliation with Asia Society

    Goal: Implementation of a traveling exhibition, a website, a symposium, a catalog, and educational and public programs, together with production of a complementary two-hour documentary film; the film concerns the sites of major events of the life of the Buddha, and the traveling exhibition concerns the art of Buddhist pilgrimages to those sites.

    Description: Asia Society, the preeminent multi-disciplinary institution dedicated to understanding Asia, and David Grubin, the distinguished documentary film producer, come together for a joint project examining the life of the Buddha and Buddhist pilgrimage. Through a two-hour documentary film biography of the Buddha, a dynamic, multi-venue international loan exhibition on Buddhist pilgrimage practice, PILGRIMAGE AND BUDDHIST ART, with more than 100 objects, an accompanying scholarly catalogue, interactive web site, symposium, and related humanities programs, this unprecedented project will explore the life of the Buddha and Buddhist pilgrimage practice across all of Asia. Since the Buddha???s life experiences are integral to places and practice of pilgrimage, the exhibition and documentary are designed to enhance one another. The PBS nationwide premier of the documentary, THE BUDDHA, will coincide with the exhibition opening in February 2010.

    Grant: 194641 / GI-50066-09,   Category: Art History and Criticism,   Division: Public Programs,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $950,000

    An American Turning Point


    Recipient: Jackson, Cheryl L (Richmond, VA 23219 USA) in affiliation with Virginia Sesquicentennial of the American Civil War Commission

    Goal: Implementation of a traveling exhibition, a mobile gallery, a panel exhibition, a permanent online web exhibition, and related educational and public programs in observance of the Sesquicentennial of the American Civil War.

    Description: Serving a national resources to the 150th anniversary of the American Civil War, An American Turning Point is a four component exhibition (gallery, mobile, panel and online)that will narrate the personal stories of those living though one of our nation's most challenging times. The exhibition will highlight the experiences and accomplishments of both Union and Confederate men, women and children as well as African Americans both free and enslaves on the home and battlefronts. The first three components will travel throughout the region and country taking these often under told stories directly to the people in rural and metropolitan areas. The online component, which will host, several of the media components from the gallery and mobile exhibitions, will remain indefinitely on the website of the Virginia Historical Society serving as a lasting legacy long after the end of the sesquicentennial.

    Grant: 197005 / GI-50133-09,   Category: American History,   Division: Public Programs,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $400,000

    Lincoln and New York


    Recipient: Mirrer, Louise (New York, NY 10024 USA) in affiliation with New-York Historical Society

    Goal: Implementation of a large interpretive traveling exhibition, a website, a smaller traveling nine-panel exhibition that would circulate nationwide, a catalog, and public educational programs on Lincoln and his relationship to New York City.

    Description: The New-York Historical Society will organize and install "Lincoln and New York," a major interpretive exhibition and national traveling component that will explore for the very first time how America's flourishing media and financial capital-also a center of Northern pro-slavery sentiment and anti-Lincoln Democratic politics-contributed to and influenced Lincoln's political rise, his prosecution of the Civil War, his decisions on emancipation and African-American enlistment, and ultimately Lincoln's place in history. The exhibition will present more than 100 objects, including original artifacts, iconic images, period newspapers, original paintings and sculpture, and hand-written period documents. The traveling component will feature text panels, facsimiles of objects and documents, selected original works from the Society's collections, and media components, including an introductory film and audio-visual presentations of speeches and the media creation of national candidates.

    Grant: 196994 / GI-50122-09,   Category: American History,   Division: Public Programs,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $400,000

    Emily Dickinson�s Garden: The Poetry of Flowers


    Recipient: (Bronx, NY 10458-5126 USA) in affiliation with New York Botanical Garden (Bronx, NY 10458 USA)

    Goal: Implementation of outdoor and indoor exhibitions, and public and educational programs, exploring the importance of plants as a source of inspiration for noted American poet Emily Dickinson.

    Description: The New York Botanical Garden requests an implementation grant in the amount of $400,000 to help underwrite the costs associated with Emily Dickinson's Flowers, a Garden-wide multi-element exhibit that will demonstrate the importance of plants as a source of inspiration for poets and writers, in general, and to Dickinson, in particular. The exhibit, sited throughout the Garden???s 250-acre historic landscape including the LuEsther T. Mertz Library, the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, the Everett Children's Adventure Garden, and the permanent collection, will examine both the relationship between art and nature and Dickinson as a gardener, a poet, an amateur botanist, and a lover of flowers. Using dynamic and interpretative displays, signage, and educational and public programming activities, Emily Dickinson's Flowers will illustrate the natural marriage between plants and the written word, and make Dickinson???s poetry broadly accessible to general audiences.

    Grant: 197002 / GI-50130-09,   Category: Interdisciplinary,   Division: Public Programs,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $400,000

    For All The World To See: Visual Culture and the Struggle for Civil Rights


    Recipient: (New York, NY 10025 USA) in affiliation with University of Maryland, Baltimore County (Baltimore, MD 21250 USA)

    Goal: Implementation of a traveling exhibition with a catalog, a website, and public and school programs about how photographs and media images were used to influence attitudes toward racial equality and African American culture during the fight to achieve civil rights.

    Description: Organized by the Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture (CADVC) in partnership with the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC), Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, For All The World To See: Visual Culture and the Struggle for Civil Rights represents the first comprehensive exhibition and publication to analyze the historical role played by visual images in shaping, influencing, and transforming the fight for civil rights in the United States. It will explore the ways this imagery represented race in order to perpetuate the status quo, stimulate dialogue, or change prevailing beliefs and attitudes. It will examine the extent to which the birth of the modern civil rights movement was coextensive with the birth of television and the rise of picture magazines and other forms of visual mass media, effectively capitalizing on the power of visual images to alter perceptions about race.

    Grant: 197007 / GI-50135-09,   Category: Arts History & Criticism,   Division: Public Programs,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $380,000

    Fiery Pool: Maya and the Mythic Sea


    Recipient: (Salem, MA 01970-3783 USA) in affiliation with Peabody Essex Museum

    Goal: Implementation of a traveling exhibition, a catalog, a website, and educational and public programs that will offer new perspectives on the centrality of water in ancient Maya art and culture.

    Description: The Peabody Essex Museum requests $400,000 toward the costs of Fiery Pool: Maya and the Mythic Sea, a ground-breaking traveling exhibition, publication, interactive website and suite of school and intergenerational public programs that will present recent scholarship, newly excavated material, and recent advances in epigraphy to a broad general public. This first truly themed exhibition on Maya art and culture will investigate the centrality of water, primarily the sea, to Maya daily life and spiritual beliefs and practices through 90 objects from 10 countries but primarily from those in the Yucatan region of Central America. Objects range in size from small, finely incised precious materials to large-scale stone stela and carved architectural elements up to 11 feet tall. Multi-media interpretive elements will allow visitors to better "read" Maya symbolism, particularly relating to water and water rituals as well as to understand Maya hieroglyphic writing and origin stories.

    Grant: 194637 / GI-50062-09,   Category: Art History and Criticism,   Division: Public Programs,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $380,000

    Designing Tomorrow: America's World's Fairs of the 1930s


    Recipient: (Washington, DC 20001 USA) in affiliation with National Building Museum (Washington, DC 20016 USA)

    Goal: Implementation of a traveling exhibition exploring how the modern architectural and industrial design displayed at the 1930s world's fairs articulated a unique American modernism and laid the groundwork for post-World War II consumerism.

    Description: Designing Tomorrow: America's World's Fairs of the 1930s investigates the history of modern design at six expositions across the United States between 1933 and 1939. The fairs propelled a modernist vision into the popular imagination and laid the groundwork for what would emerge as a fully-realized post-war consumer culture. In the midst of the Great Depression, they articulated a unique American modernism that amounted to a revolution in transportation, urban design, domestic life, and communication. Companies like General Electric, Ford, and DuPont publicized their most innovative products. A new generation of architects and designers promoted visions of superhighways and suburban communities and experimented with buildings framed in steel, beautified with glass block, and economically constructed of drywall, Masonite, and plywood. The 6,000 sq. ft. exhibition, the first to treat the six Depression-era fairs, features nearly 200 artifacts, archival footage, and interactive stations.

    Grant: 196925 / GI-50104-09,   Category: Interdisciplinary,   Division: Public Programs,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $350,000

    American Arcadia: People, Landscape, and Nature at Montgomery Place


    Recipient: (Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA) in affiliation with Historic Hudson Valley

    Goal: Implementation of a reinterpretation of a historic country estate, using the experiences of residents and workers to illustrate important turning points in American attitudes toward nature and landscape.

    Description: Funding is sought to reinterpret a significant property owned by Historic Hudson Valley (HHV). Using as a focusing device the experiences of four women who shaped this country estate during its 200-year history, the new interpretation will illustrate important turning points in American attitudes toward nature and landscape. As it forges a more integrated, effective way for house museums to interpret the built and natural environments, HHV will strive to help visitors understand how American points of view about landscape and nature have changed over time and why those shifts matter. Project formats include an interpretive tour of the nearly 400-acre site; web-based programs and blog; and publications. The story of Montgomery Place reflects many of the ideas and values that have shaped America???s land and people. The project addresses how cultural attitudes toward the natural world determine human actions, and how these actions in turn affect people???s environments.

    Grant: 194649 / GI-50074-09,   Category: American History,   Division: Public Programs,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $350,000

    The Amazing Circus Poster/Strobridge Lithography Company: 1879-1939


    Recipient: (Cincinnati, OH 45202 USA) in affiliation with Cincinnati Art Museum

    Goal: Implementation of a traveling exhibition, a catalog, a website, educational materials, and public programs that explore the cultural significance of the circus poster during its golden age in America.

    Description: Funding is requested to organize the first major exhibition and catalogue devoted to the American circus poster. The exhibition will include 104 circus posters, along with related photographs, films, and circus ephemera. These will show the artistic significance of the American circus poster as well as its impact on the nation as it moved into the 20th century. In addition to traditional text interpretation, the exhibit will include a cell phone audio tour, a printed family guide, and interactive learning stations. The exhibition will travel to the Cincinnati Art Museum, The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, and one other venue. The 350-page catalogue will provide full-page color reproductions of all posters in the exhibit alongside historical analysis by scholars. Other project components include K-12 lesson plans, an exhibition website, and educational programs at the Cincinnati Art Museum and Ringling Museum of Art.

    Grant: 197013 / GI-50141-09,   Category: Art History and Criticism,   Division: Public Programs,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $350,000

    Dogon Now: Masks in Motion


    Recipient: (Long Island City, NY 11101 USA) in affiliation with Museum for African Art

    Goal: Implementation of a traveling exhibition and a publication on the art and masquerades of the Dogon people of Mali.

    Description: "Dogon Now" is a traveling exhibtion of the art and masquerades of the Dogon people of Mali, 5,000 square feet in size, featuring approximately 100 objects and using video and photographs to immerse audiences in the experience of Dogon masquerades from a variety of viewpoints. It will open at the Museum for African Art in New York in mid-2011, travel to two or three other venues in North America, two in Europe, and close atthe National Museum of Mali in 2013. There will be an accompanying catalogue, 200 pages, full color illustrations.

    Grant: 197133 / GI-50156-09,   Category: Anthropology,   Division: Public Programs,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $325,000

    Tipi of the Great Plains Exhibition


    Recipient: (Brooklyn, NY 11238 USA) in affiliation with Brooklyn Museum of Art (Brooklyn, NY 11238-6052 USA)

    Goal: Implementation of a traveling exhibition and a catalog on the Plains Indian tipi, highlighting its historical role in Plains cultures and its continued importance as a symbol of identity.

    Description: The Brooklyn Museum seeks $400,000 to support the exhibition, The Tipi of the Great Plains, a touring project that will premiere at the Brooklyn Museum in September 2010. The project received planning support from the Endowment and draws on input from a wide range of Native American and non-Native scholars. The exhibition will offer new and informative perspectives on this icon of the American cultural landscape by examining this complex cultural tradition that underlies Plains tribal identity. The exhibition will draw from Brooklyn Museum???s significant holdings of Plains material, supplemented by loans and four specially-commissioned full-scale tipis, one of which may be entered by all visitors. The exhibition catalogue will be the first major contribution to the general literature of tipis in more than four decades.

    Grant: 194666 / GI-50091-09,   Category: Art History and Criticism,   Division: Public Programs,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $300,000

    Connecticut's Urban Reading Initiative


    Recipient: (Middletown, CT 06457-3204 USA) in affiliation with Connecticut Humanities Council (Middletown, CT 06457 USA)

    Goal: The expansion of reading and discussion programs for at-risk children ages 8-12 and their families in three Connecticut cities over a three-year period and the formation of the Go Read statewide enriched reading coalition and website.

    Description: The Connecticut Humanities Council (CHC) seeks $400,000 in National Endowment for the Humanities support to accelerate the development of an integrated system of enriched reading partnerships in the cities of Hartford, New Haven and New London that brings professionally-led book discussion programs to a city-wide array of agencies and organizations currently serving children. Our goal is not to create a brief flurry of reading activity in these non traditional sites but to incorporate after school programs, Boys and Girls Clubs, Catholic Charities, family resource centers,family service agencies, learning centers, agencies serving the families of incarcerated parents and other community organizations who have children as a primary constituency. In the three-year life of the grant, the Council expects to involve at least 10,000 low-income, primarily minority children and families in enriched reading programming.

    Grant: 194638 / GI-50063-09,   Category: Humanities,   Division: Public Programs,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $300,000

    Coming to California: The Gallery of California History


    Recipient: (Oakland, CA 94607 USA) in affiliation with Oakland Museum/Museum of California Foundation

    Goal: Implementation of a permanent exhibition, docent tours, a website, and public programs on the history of California.

    Description: The Oakland Museum of California (OMCA) seeks support in the amount of $400,000 to complete the reinstallation of its 25,800 square-foot permanent Gallery of California History and to develop and implement accompanying educational programs. OMCA???s history collections contain the largest, finest, and most comprehensive collection of California material culture anywhere. The Gallery of California History was originally created in the 1960s and 70s, and it has been more than 20 years since it has been updated. The new installation of the gallery will include approximately 2,200 historical artifacts, works of art, ethnographic materials, and original photographs. This reinstallation is part of a major transformation of the entire museum that will realize the institution???s deep and continuing commitment to telling the full story of California and its people. The opening of the new Gallery of California History is planned for early 2010.

    Grant: 194661 / GI-50086-09,   Category: American History,   Division: Public Programs,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $299,750

    Lincoln in American Memory


    Recipient: (New York, NY 10022 USA) in affiliation with Literary Classics of the United States, Inc. (New York, NY 10023 USA)

    Description: The Library of America requests a grant in the amount of $299,750 in partial support of Lincoln in American Memory (to borrow a title from Merrill Peterson???s authoritative study): a book, a public programming resource, and a website, all designed to encourage exploration of the ongoing meaning and uses of Abraham Lincoln???s legacy in American history, society, and culture. Organized to mark the bicentennial of Abraham Lincoln???s birth in February 2009, Lincoln in American Memory will complement other projects organized to commemorate the bicentennial, including traveling exhibitions and public programming initiatives supported by NEH, for which our project would provide a unique and indispensable resource. The project is designed to make the Lincoln Bicentennial an even more significant and substantive occasion for public conversation.

    Grant: 194575 / GI-50059-09,   Category: American History,   Division: Public Programs,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $225,000

    Fences and Neighbors: New Hampshire's Immigration Stories


    Recipient: (Concord, NH 03301 USA) in affiliation with New Hampshire Humanities Council

    Goal: Implementation of a three-year, statewide project examining immigration to New Hampshire through a wide variety of formats, including oral histories and reading and discussion programs.

    Description: The New Hampshire Humanities Council requests support for ???Fences and Neighbors: New Hampshire???s Immigration Stories,??? a three-year statewide initiative on immigration. The project is designed to create and implement public humanities programs that foreground face to face conversations and also to support grass-roots humanities programming and oral history collection where immigrants and refugees have settled in the densest numbers along the I-93 corridor. Programs will a)increase knowledge about immigrants and refugees and about our immigration policies in general; b) enable collaborations among municipal, legal, civic, and religious organizations that can plan and implement humanities-based public programs on immigration; c)assist immigrants and refugees to acquire language and cultural literacy; d)encourage the exchange of stories among older immigrants and new arrivals to raise cultural awareness for New Hampshire residents.

    Grant: 194655 / GI-50080-09,   Category: Humanities,   Division: Public Programs,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $200,000

    Make Big Plans: Daniel Burnham's Vision of an American Metropolis--An Online and Panel Exhibition


    Recipient: Akerman, James R (Chicago, IL 60610 USA) in affiliation with Newberry Library

    Goal: Development of a 60-minute television documentary on the life and work of architect and urban planner Daniel Burnham.

    Description: Make Big Plans: Daniel Burnham's Vision of an American Metropolis commemorates the centennial of the publication of the Plan of Chicago (1909) by Daniel Burnham and Edward Bennett with simultaneous exhibitions, a website, and public programming that will help Americans explore the implications of the Burnham Plan's ideas about urbanism, regionalism, and planning. The Burnham Plan will serve as a lens through which the project explores how people create the places they inhabit. The Newberry Library will develop the exhibitions, which will be presented in approximately 50 public libraries and other venues throughout the Chicago region, and to a national audience through a robust web-based exhibition. These exhibitions and programs will introduce regional and national audiences will explore the /Plan of Chicago/'s historical context, and critically examine its influence on the 20th century landscape of Chicago, its region, and metropolitan America. The project will run from 4/09 to 9/10.

    Grant: 194612 / GI-50095-09,   Category: American History,   Division: Public Programs,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $30,000

    Exploring our Exhibitions: Lectures and Conferences at Map@PLAZA


    Recipient: (Ponce, PR 00732-9027 USA) in affiliation with Museo de Arte de Ponce (Ponce, PR 00733 USA)

    Grant: 197341 / GI-50161-09,   Category: Humanities,   Division: Public Programs,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $30,000

    Beauty and Belief: Crossing Bridges with the Arts of Islam


    Recipient: (Provo, UT 84602-1400 USA) in affiliation with Brigham Young University, Provo (Provo, UT 84602 USA)

    Grant: 197482 / GI-50162-09,   Category: Humanities,   Division: Public Programs,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $10,000

    Race and Emancipation in the Age of Lincoln


    Recipient: (Washington, DC 20059 USA) in affiliation with Howard University

    Grant: 196804 / GI-50103-09,   Category: American History,   Division: Public Programs,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • Endowment for the humanities grants to program America's Historical & Cultural Organizations Implementation; items 1-21 of 28 with a total funding of $7,029,750.
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