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  • $168,079

    Punishment, Politics, and Culture


    Recipient: (Amherst, MA 01002-5000 USA) in affiliation with Amherst College (Amherst, MA 01002 USA)

    Goal: A five-week school teacher summer seminar for sixteen participants on punishment and its place in American culture.

    Description: From The Gospel of Matthew to George Bernard Shaw and former Supreme Court Justice William Brennan, many have remarked that how a society punishes reveals its true character. Punishment then tells us who we are. The way a society punishes demonstrates its commitment to standards of judgment and justice, its distinctive views of blame and responsibility, its understandings of mercy and forgiveness, and its particular ways of responding to evil. The Seminar I am proposing, Punishment, Politics, and Culture, will examine the nature and limits of punishment and its place in the "American story." This Seminar will address questions about punishment that go to the heart of humanistic inquiry.

    Grant: 197374 / FV-50201-09,   Category: Law and Jurisprudence,   Division: Education Programs,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $167,863

    Poetry as a Form of Life, Life as a Form of Poetry


    Recipient: (Cambridge, MA 02138 USA) in affiliation with Harvard University

    Goal: A four-week school teacher seminar for sixteen participants to study how British and American poetry meditates on life and reflects the patterns of life.

    Description: Summer Seminar for Teachers. A four-week seminar at Harvard University, led by Professor Helen Vendler.

    Grant: 197397 / FV-50224-09,   Category: American Literature,   Division: Education Programs,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $156,649

    Historical Interpretations of the Industrial Revolution in Britain


    Recipient: (N. Dartmouth, MA 02747 USA) in affiliation with University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth (North Dartmouth, MA 02747 USA)

    Goal: A five-week school teacher summer seminar in London and in Nottingham for sixteen participants to study the experience of industrialization in Britain between 1700 and 1850.

    Description: This five-week summer seminar for teachers will use contemporary sources, both text and images, major historical interpretations, and five day-long and one three-day site visits to museums, historical and archeological sites,and the built environment in London, the Midlands and the North of England to study the experience of industrualization in Britain between ca. 1700 and 1850. The seminar will meet at the Institute for Historical Research in London for one week and for four weeks at Rutland Hall, University of Nottingham.

    Grant: 197380 / FV-50207-09,   Category: British History,   Division: Education Programs,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $150,783

    The Canterbury Tales and Medieval Culture


    Recipient: (North Haven, CT 06473 USA) in affiliation with Yale University (New Haven, CT 06520 USA)

    Goal: : A six-week school teacher summer seminar for sixteen participants on Chaucer's Canterbury Tales and its cultural context.

    Description: This six-week Summer Seminar for School Teachers provides an opportunity to read Chaucer's Canterbury Tales both as literary masterpiece in its own right and as a way of understanding the central values and practices of late medieval culture. Members of the seminar will learn to read the work in the original Middle English, will have the opportunity to discuss each of the Tales in detail, and will read historians' accounts of the central issues of medieval culture that the Tales explore. The goal of the seminar is to empower the participants with a secure understanding both of Chaucer and of medieval culture so that they can return to their classrooms confident in their ability to teach the literature and history of the period.

    Grant: 197378 / FV-50205-09,   Category: Medieval Studies,   Division: Education Programs,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $143,015

    Literary Picaros and Picaras and their Travels in Early Modern Spain


    Recipient: (Coral Gables, FL 33146-2074 USA) in affiliation with University of Miami (Coral Gables, FL 33124 USA)

    Goal: A four-week school teacher seminar for sixteen participants on the picaresque literature of early modern Spain, to be held in Salamanca, Toledo, Sevilla, and Madrid, and conducted in Spanish.

    Description: "Literary Picaros and Picaras and their Travels in Early Modern Spain" is a four-week seminar mainly for school teachers of Spanish language and Spanish literature. In the seminar we will read and analyze the most famous picaresque novels of 16th and 17th Century Spain whose protagonists are poor young boys (and occasionally girls) known as picaros and whose lives reflected the poverty and tensions that occurred in Spain during this period. All seminar lectures will be in Spanish and will take place at the actual locations where the picaros and picaras lived and traveled: Madrid, Salamanca, Toledo, and Sevilla. Participants will have occasion to tour museums, churches, and other historical sites to learn the culture of early modern Spain. Participants will be expected to give an oral presentation during the seminar and complete a course project they may utilize in the classroom.

    Grant: 197389 / FV-50216-09,   Category: Spanish Literature,   Division: Education Programs,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $141,320

    Germany's Cosmopolitan Capital: Berlin and the Myth of German Monoculturalism


    Recipient: (College Station, TX 77843-4215 USA) in affiliation with Texas A & M Research Foundation (College Station, TX 77843 USA)

    Goal: A five-week school teacher seminar for sixteen participants to study Germany's cosmopolitan society over the past two centuries, to be held in Berlin.

    Description: This seminar uses writers and film makers associated with Berlin, the city's museums, neighborhoods, and larger cultural scene to explore how German society's sense of itself has been tested and enriched by its encounters with migrants during the past two centuries. Participants will use the tools of the humanities to contrast the twin myths of German homogeneity and German monoculturalism with the literary and social reality of Germany's cosmopolitan capital. Locating the seminar in Berlin will let participants make the leap from intellectual awareness to a genuine understanding of contemporary German culture. Our objects of inquiry include an 18th-century French migrant to Berlin, who became a key author in Germany's Romantic tradition and a number of Berlin's German-Jewish authors. The seminar also focuses on the Turkish Germans, and includes a Russian Jew and Berlin resident, now one of the most popular chroniclers of "multi-cultural Germany."

    Grant: 197398 / FV-50225-09,   Category: German Language,   Division: Education Programs,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $140,812

    The Political Theory of Hannah Arendt: The Problem of Evil and the Origins of Totalitarianism


    Recipient: (San Diego, CA 92182 USA) in affiliation with San Diego State University Foundation

    Goal: A six-week school teacher seminar for sixteen participants on the political theory of Hannah Arendt.

    Description: During this seminar we will study intensively several key works by the political theorist, Hannah Arendt. These works shed light on the problem of evil and the use of terror in the contemporary age, and provide a philosophical perspective on current debates about the use of violence to settle political conflicts, about the conditions of democracy, and about the scope and importance of human rights. Based on the success of my 2006 and 2008 seminars on Arendt with schoolteachers, who responded powerfully to the relevance of Arendt to their own thinking and teaching, and the advance interest I have received for my 2009 seminar, I propose to repeat the seminar in 2010 with a few modifications.

    Grant: 197390 / FV-50217-09,   Category: Political Science,   Division: Education Programs,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $139,654

    America and The Great War: An Interdisciplinary Seminar in Literature and History


    Recipient: (Lawrence, KS 66045-7590 USA) in affiliation with University of Kansas Center for Research, Inc (Lawrence, KS 66045-3101 USA)

    Goal: A five-week school teacher summer seminar for sixteen participants on the United States and World War I, focused on the conflict's history and cultural impact.

    Description: This NEH Summer Seminar for School Teachers will draw on literature, history, and the visual arts to examine America's relationship to the Great War--a major turning point in both American and world history. Co-directed by a literary scholar and an historian, it will involve coordinated readings, trips to the National World War I Museum and Fort Leavenworth, an on-campus art exhibit and play, and work with original documents to provide school teachers with a rich experience of intellectual renewal and development.

    Grant: 199827 / FV-50238-09,   Category: American Literature,   Division: Education Programs,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $131,663

    Chaucer's Canterbury Tales


    Recipient: (Charleston, IL 61920 USA) in affiliation with Eastern Illinois University

    Goal: A four-week school teacher summer seminar for sixteen participants on Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales, to be held in London.

    Description: We propose a four-week Seminar for School Teachers on Chaucer's Canterbury Tales to be team-taught in London, England. The Seminar will explore how Chaucer looks out upon the world, as participants consider the relevance of Chaucer's poetry for readers now, that is, how his vivid ideas on human relationships and desires mesh with and yet challenge modern attitudes. As we progress through the tales, we will join together in making discoveries about the distance that separates us from the lived details of Chaucer's fourteenth-century England; about the continuities of artistry, philosophy, emotion, and meaning that render Chaucer's writings still important; and about the variety of responses to Chaucer that combine to achieve understandings inherently richer than those reached by reading alone. Participants will read the Canterbury Tales in the original Middle English, and we will visit historical sites in London, Canterbury, and Oxford relevant to an appreciation of the text.

    Grant: 197376 / FV-50203-09,   Category: Medieval Studies,   Division: Education Programs,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $121,439

    The Arabic Novel in Translation


    Recipient: (Philadelphia, PA 19104-6305 USA) in affiliation with Swarthmore College (Swarthmore, PA 19081 USA)

    Goal: A four-week school teacher seminar for sixteen participants to explore the Arabic novel.

    Description: This seminar will introduce the participants to a literary tradition with which relatively few high-school teachers in this country are familiar, that of Arabic, and more specifically to modern Arabic fiction and its cultural context.

    Grant: 197394 / FV-50221-09,   Category: Near Eastern Literature,   Division: Education Programs,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $97,816

    The Abolitionist Movement: Fighting Against Slavery and Racial Injustice from the American Revolution to the Civil War.


    Recipient: (Rochester, NY 14623 USA) in affiliation with Library Company of Philadelphia (Philadelphia, PA 19107 USA)

    Goal: A four-week school teacher seminar for sixteen participants to examine the abolitionist movement from the rise of the American Revolution to the aftermath of the Civil War.

    Description: This four-week seminar will bring together fifteen school teachers for close study of primary documents and key secondary works on the abolitionist movement between the American Revolution and the Civil War. Participants will examine the evolution of the abolitionist movement, from its beginnings in Philadelphia during the Revolutionary era through its radicalization in the years leading to the Civil War. Teachers will focus on several sub-themes in abolitionist scholarship (including African American involvement in the movement, the expanding role of female reformers, and the early struggle against slavery in Northern states) and discuss the pedagogical effectiveness of using primary sources in high school classrooms. Visits to some of the abolitionist movement's most significant sites in the Philadelphia area will enrich participants' understanding of abolitionism as a lived experience rooted in a particular place.

    Grant: 197401 / FV-50228-09,   Category: American History,   Division: Education Programs,   Year Awarded: 2009

  • $174,902

    Dante's Commedia


    Recipient: (South Burlington, VT 04503 USA) in affiliation with University of Vermont (Burlington, VT 05405 USA)

    Goal: A six-week seminar for fifteen school teachers on Dante's Commedia in Siena, Italy.

    Description: A six-week Seminar for School Teachers on Dante's Commedia in Siena, Italy.

    Grant: 191938 / FV-50179-08,   Category: Medieval Studies,   Division: Education Programs,   Year Awarded: 2008

  • $162,029

    The Dutch Republic and Britain: The Making of Modern Society and a European World Economy


    Recipient: (N. Dartmouth, MA 02747 USA) in affiliation with University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth (North Dartmouth, MA 02747 USA)

    Goal: A five-week summer seminar for fifteen school teachers, to be held in Great Britain and the Netherlands, on the evolution of modern economic systems in Europe.

    Description: The purpose of this five-week NEH Summer Seminar for School Teachers at the Historical Institute in London and the Netherlands Institute for Advanced Studies in Wassenaar is to investigate how a region of northwest Europe, centered on the North Sea, acquired the characteristics that historians have labeled modern. We will study how the national economy of the Dutch Republic rose to dominance in the new European world-economy of the seventeenth century, how Britain acquired this supremacy in the eighteenth century, and how it transformed itself to become the first industrial nation. Using a comparative method, we will study contemporary accounts, historical documents, and seminal historical interpretations. We will also visit some of the key places that experienced this world-historical transformation.

    Grant: 191928 / FV-50169-08,   Category: European History,   Division: Education Programs,   Year Awarded: 2008

  • $147,646

    Visions of the Dark Years: World War II and its Legacy in France


    Recipient: (College Station, TX 77843-4215 USA) in affiliation with Texas A & M Research Foundation (College Station, TX 77843 USA)

    Goal: A five-week seminar for fifteen school teachers to study the legacy and memory of World War II in France through literary texts, films, historical sites, and public debates that have to do with that epoch, to be held in Paris, Lyon, Vichy, and Caen, France.

    Description: This seminar examines the troubled legacy of the German Occupation of France during World War II through a study of important films, novels and histories of the period and its memory. Participants will also visit and discuss important museums, monuments, and battle sites in Paris, Lyon, Vichy and Normandy, and discuss the so-called Vichy Syndrome with leading French historians, journalists, and publishers.

    Grant: 191953 / FV-50194-08,   Category: French Language,   Division: Education Programs,   Year Awarded: 2008

  • $145,271

    The Political Theory of Hannah Arendt: The Problem of Evil and the Origins of Totalitarianism


    Recipient: (San Diego, CA 92182 USA) in affiliation with San Diego State University Foundation

    Goal: A six-week seminar for fifteen school teachers to study three major works by political theorist Hannah Arendt, which provide philosophical lenses to consider the problem of evil, the uses of terror, and the origins of totalitarianism.

    Description: This six week seminar will provide intensive study of several key works by the political theorist Hannah Arendt for fifteen secondary school teachers. The works to be studied are The Origins of Totalitarianism, The Human Condition, and Eichmann in Jerusalem. These works shed light on the problem of evil and use of terror in the contemporary age, and provide a philosophical perspective on current debates about the use of violence to settle political conflicts, about the conditions of democracy, and the scope of importance of human rights in global perspective.

    Grant: 191946 / FV-50187-08,   Category: Political Science,   Division: Education Programs,   Year Awarded: 2008

  • $140,414

    The Thirteeth Century "Lives" of St. Francis of Assisi


    Recipient: (Geneseo, NY 14454-1460 USA) in affiliation with SUNY Research Foundation, College at Geneseo (Geneseo, NY 14454 USA)

    Goal: A six-week summer seminar, convening in Siena and Assisi, Italy, for fifteen school teachers to study the life, works, and representations of St. Francis of Assisi.

    Description: For six weeks, we shall study several versions of the life of St. Francis of Assisi that were written and painted in the 13th century. The texts will be three 13th century lives of Francis that had official status in the Order--the two versions by Thomas of Celano and the Leganda Maior of Bonaventure. The narrative paintings are now in Pescia, Pistoia, Florence, Siena, and Assisi. For three weeks, the seminar will meet in Siena and then move to Assisi where Francis lived and died. We will usually meet four times per week and will visit all of the paintings listed above. Each participant will create a written project and present a version to the group. For projects focusing on a particular work, on site presentations will be arranged.

    Grant: 191937 / FV-50178-08,   Category: Medieval Studies,   Division: Education Programs,   Year Awarded: 2008

  • $138,315

    Shakespeare: Enacting the Text


    Recipient: (Newark, DE 19716 USA) in affiliation with University of Delaware

    Goal: A five-week seminar for fifteen school teachers on Shakespeare and performance, to be conducted at the University of Delaware and in Stratford-upon-Avon, England.

    Description: The seminar will focus upon the ways that literary and theatrical analysis of Shakespeare's plays can most usefully be combined. While The Merchant of Venice and Romeo and Juliet will be the primary texts studied in weeks 2-3, the first week will be spent on "Finding the Text," i.e. studying early printed versions of Shakespeare's plays, promptbooks, "subtext," and related topics, including sources and historical backgrounds. Videotapes of productions will be shown and analyzed and the last two weeks will be held in Stratford-upon-Avon, U.K., studying Royal Shakespeare Company productions, meeting with actors and other RSC personnel as well as members of the Shakespeare Centre staff and fellows of the Shakespeare Institute. A trip to London to see performances at the Globe Theatre and a visit to the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C. will also be included in the seminar.

    Grant: 191940 / FV-50181-08,   Category: British Literature,   Division: Education Programs,   Year Awarded: 2008

  • $127,171

    Reading Don Quixote


    Recipient: (Binghamton, NY 13902 USA) in affiliation with Binghamton University

    Goal: A six-week seminar for fifteen school teachers focusing on multiple readings of Cervantes's Don Quixote.

    Description: Reading Don Quixote: During the six weeks of this seminar our purpose and our enjoyment will be to do a careful reading of Cervantes's masterpiece. Besides laying the foundation for the modern novel Don Quixote incorporates a critique of the reading of fiction and of literature as a whole. While reader-response will provide the general framework of our engagement, other theoretical strategies will offer useful approaches to key aspects of the book, in particular to issues such as the relationship of language to reality (the interplay of linguistic registers, the connections between narrative and identity, and others), and the interplay of fiction and history. The seminar will meet three times a week for three hours. Participants will be asked to write a journal of their engagement with the book and a short (5-6p) paper on a topic of their choice.

    Grant: 191942 / FV-50183-08,   Category: Spanish Literature,   Division: Education Programs,   Year Awarded: 2008

  • $119,986

    Production and Consumption in World History, 1450 to 1950


    Recipient: (Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA) in affiliation with University of California, Santa Cruz

    Goal: A four-week summer seminar for fifteen school teachers examining the history of trade in several important commodities from the mid-fifteenth through the mid-twentieth centuries.

    Description: The purpose of the Summer Seminar on "Production and Consumption in World History, 1450-1950" is to explore the historical connections between producers and consumers of basic commodities across the globe as a way of understanding how the modern world economy emerged. By studying the linked histories of production and consumption we can better see how the world economy has fashioned and refashioned the world, linking South Asian spinners, textile factory workers in the East Midlands, and consumers in Europe, the Americas and Australasia, most of them predominantly female. The subject of production and consumption thus provides a point of entry for a variety of approaches to the study of the emergence of the modern world economy from its sixteenth century origins to the present.

    Grant: 192035 / FV-50197-08,   Category: History,   Division: Education Programs,   Year Awarded: 2008

  • $114,564

    The Isle of Man: Crossroads of Medieval Cultures and Languages


    Recipient: (Arkadelphia, AR 71999 USA) in affiliation with Henderson State University (Arkadelphia, AR 71923 USA)

    Goal: A five-week seminar in Britain for fifteen school teachers to explore the cultural, literary, and linguistic diversity of the Isle of Man in the Middle Ages.

    Description: The purpose of this five-week NEH seminar for school teachers is to provide participants with an enriched appreciation for the multicultural reality of the British Isles and Ireland (the Irish Sea cultural province) in the Middle Ages. While early British literature and culture is sometimes thought to be exclusively Anglo-Saxon, Britain was, in fact, rich in cultural and linguistic diversity. During the seminar, we will focus on five distinct cultures: the Irish, the Scots (and Picts), the Welsh, the Anglo-Saxons, and the Norse. Situating ourselves in an important nexus of these cultures on the Isle of Man, we will focus on the Irish Sea as a microcosm of cultural connection rather than as a barrier. The ultimate goal of the seminar then is to make Medieval literature and culture accessible to high school teachers and to utilize this avenue to make the variety and complexity of the Middle Ages accessible to their students who will ultimately be the primary beneficiaries.

    Grant: 192041 / FV-50198-08,   Category: Medieval Studies,   Division: Education Programs,   Year Awarded: 2008

  • Endowment for the humanities grants to program Seminars for School Teachers; items 1-21 of 985 with a total funding of $2,829,391.
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